Blog Photos Vancouver BC Canada

Photography blog and website by Titans Lens Vancouver BC. Please feel free to explore the site for items of interest. You are free to down load our images. We would appreciate photo credit if you post them online.

We welcome new followers to the Vancouver photo blog pages posted here. Maple Ridge photography services are available.

FOLLOW THE VANCOUVER PHOTO BLOG NOW !

  • BLOG - Maple Ridge Photography
Fantastic art is a broad and loosely defined art genre. It is not restricted to a specific school of artists, geographical location or historical period.

It can be characterized by subject matter – which portrays non-realistic, mystical, mythical or folkloric subjects or events – and style, which is representational and naturalistic, rather than abstract - or in the case of magazine illustrations and similar, in the style of graphic novel art such ...



Fantasy has been an integral part of art since its beginnings, but has been particularly important in mannerism, magic realist painting, romantic art, symbolism, surrealism and lowbrow. In French, the genre is called le fantastique, in English it is sometimes referred to as visionary art, grotesque art or mannerist art. It has had a deep and circular interaction with fantasy literature.


The subject matter of Fantastic Art may resemble the product of hallucinations, and Fantastic artist Richard Dadd spent much of his life in mental institutions. Salvador Dalí famously said: "the only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad". Some recent Fantastic Art draws on the artist's experience, or purported experience, of hallucinogenic drugs.


The term Fantasy Art is closely related, and is applied primarily to recent art (typically 20th century onwards) inspired by, or illustrating, fantasy literature. The term has acquired some pejorative overtones.


Fantastic art has traditionally been largely confined to painting and illustration, but since the 1970s has increasingly been found also in photography.


Fantastic art explores fantasy, imagination, the dream state, the grotesque, visions and the uncanny, as well as so-called "Goth" art.

  • BLOG - Maple Ridge Photography

Updated: May 14

Wildlife photography is a genre of photography concerned with documenting various forms of wildlife in their natural habitat.

As well as requiring photography skills, wildlife photographers may need field craft skills. For example, some animals are difficult to approach and thus a knowledge of the animal's behavior is needed in order to be able to predict its actions.


Photographing some species may require stalking skills or the use of a hide/blind for concealment.


While wildlife photographs can be taken using basic equipment, successful photography of some types of wildlife requires specialist equipment, such as macro lenses for insects, long focal length lenses for birds and underwater cameras for marine life.


However, a great wildlife photograph can also be the result of being in the right place at the right time and often involves a good understanding of animal behavior in order to anticipate interesting situations to capture in photography.


In the early days of photography, it was difficult to get a photograph of wildlife due to slow lenses and the low sensitivity of photographic media. Earlier photos of animals were usually pets, stuffed, and zoo animals.





These included photos of lion cubs taken at the Bristol zoo in 1854 and in 1864, photos of the last Quagga by Frank Hayes. Wildlife photography gained more traction when faster photography emulsions and quicker shutters came in the 1880s.


Developments like these lead to photos such as the ones taken by German Ottomar Anschutz in 1884, the first shots of wild birds in action. In July 1906, National Geographic published its first wildlife photos. Those photos were taken by George Shiras III, a U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania. Some of his photos were taken with the first wire-tripped camera.

  • BLOG - Maple Ridge Photography
We work in short increments to keep your pet interested. We think of your pet as a toddler, and you'll have a good idea of how long we can keep its attention span. By taking breaks and only shooting a couple of photos at a time, we have a happier, more engaged pet for the photo shoot.


If we have another person nearby, it might be easier if they use the toy to play with the pet while we capture pictures.



Tug-of-war toys work great for dogs, and string-type toys work well for cats, as we can entice them to come over. Any toy that keeps the family pet mostly in the same place should be fine.


Balls don't work as well, unless someone is throwing a ball in your direction. Otherwise, the animal will be running away from us.


Your pets are the cutest, and of course you want photos of them to post online or just have around the house! However, whether they stay still or bounce around, pets are a tricky subject for photography. You have to work with the pet to get them to look at the camera, and you have to be quick when you're taking photos!