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  • BLOG - Maple Ridge Photography
When it comes to photoshoots make sure your subjects are in place. If it is still photography ensure that your subject does not move around as because if they do you will end up having blurry photos which are a sore to the eyes. After you have positioned your subjects look at the camera to see whether the subjects are in good place.

The Look for photo / model shaping


The manner in which your model gives her / his facial expressions can go a long way in shaping your photos.


A bland, emotionless expression might not look good. A slight smile, an off-camera look or even a cover tilt of the head can produce a far better and visually pleasing image than one where the model is giving a straight emotionless look at the camera.


As a portrait photographer a majority of times you will come across models who are not professionals and therefore have no clue about how to pose or give a facial expression. To make matters worse, they would be tensed facing up to a camera.


A good portrait photographer always brings out the best in his/her models. It is the job of the photographer to break the ice and to ease the mind of a nervous model.


As they say, 80% of the energy of a portrait photographer him/her on setting up the model, speaking to him/her and preparing him/her for the shot.

Only spent 20% of your time making the actual photos.



Best Lenses for Full Body Portraits


For full body portraits, the best option is not to shoot with too wide a lens. Wide angle lenses are affected by distortions, especially at the corners and edges.

Wide angle lenses will make your model look weird. With a wide angle lens, you cover a lot of the scene. As a result, you have to move in close in order to get a tight shot. That is what creates distortions.

Another reason to avoid a wide zoom lens is they are difficult to work with in small studios.


The best choice is something like a 50-70mm. On the other hand, with tele lenses, you have to stand too far away in order to crop out negative space. That means your subject will be compressed against a background.


Between a wide-angle zoom and a telephoto, however, choose the latter. The look is a lot more natural with a telephoto. And always shoot from a distance and zoom in rather than use the widest focal length and shoot from a close distance.

  • BLOG - Maple Ridge Photography

A christian festival celebrating the birth of Jesus. The English term Christmas (“mass on Christ’s day”) is of fairly recent origin. The earlier term Yule may have derived from the Germanic jōl or the Anglo-Saxon geōl, which referred to the feast of the winter solstice. The corresponding terms in other languages—Navidad in Spanish, Natale in Italian, Noël in French—all probably denote nativity. The German word Weihnachten denotes “hallowed night.” Since the early 20th century, Christmas has also been a secular family holiday, observed by Christians and non-Christians alike, devoid of Christian elements, and marked by an increasingly elaborate exchange of gifts. In this secular Christmas celebration, a mythical figure named Santa Claus plays the pivotal role.



The early Christian community distinguished between the identification of the date of Jesus’ birth and the liturgical celebration of that event. The actual observance of the day of Jesus’ birth was long in coming. In particular, during the first two centuries of Christianity there was strong opposition to recognizing birthdays of martyrs or, for that matter, of Jesus. Numerous Church Fathers offered sarcastic comments about the pagan custom of celebrating birthdays when, in fact, saints and martyrs should be honoured on the days of their martyrdom—their true “birthdays,” from the church’s perspective.



The precise origin of assigning December 25 as the birth date of Jesus is unclear. The New Testament provides no clues in this regard. December 25 was first identified as the date of Jesus’ birth by Sextus Julius Africanus in 221 and later became the universally accepted date. One widespread explanation of the origin of this date is that December 25 was the Christianizing of the dies solis invicti nati (“day of the birth of the unconquered sun”), a popular holiday in the Roman Empire that celebrated the winter solstice as a symbol of the resurgence of the sun, the casting away of winter and the heralding of the rebirth of spring and summer. Indeed, after December 25 had become widely accepted as the date of Jesus’ birth, Christian writers frequently made the connection between the rebirth of the sun and the birth of the Son. One of the difficulties with this view is that it suggests a nonchalant willingness on the part of the Christian church to appropriate a pagan festival when the early church was so intent on distinguishing itself categorically from pagan beliefs and practices.



A second view suggests that December 25 became the date of Jesus’ birth by a priori reasoning that identified the spring equinox as the date of the creation of the world and the fourth day of creation, when the light was created, as the day of Jesus’ conception (i.e., March 25). December 25, nine months later, then became the date of Jesus’ birth. For a long time the celebration of Jesus’ birth was observed in conjunction with his baptism, celebrated January 6.

  • BLOG - Maple Ridge Photography

Visit us now to view black and white photographs and blogs. Anyone can take snapshots; skilled amateurs capture the scenes that whiz largely unseen past the world at large. A skilled photographer spends a lifetime visualizing and snatching those rare images that flicker and fade forever. Split seconds that will never again manifest themselves.


Photography animates people's emotions. A photograph gives viewers a chance to experience the ecstasy or grief of a given moment as often as they see fit. While the here and now perishes quickly, a photo lives on.